Rose red city, half as old as time. Petra. A photo-journey.

Ah Petra, gobsmackingly magnificent, architecturally alluring, haunting and pink! Described by UNESCO as ‘one of the most precious cultural properties of man’s cultural heritage‘, as it features in their Intangible Cultural Heritage list. Additionally, the ancient Nabataean city has been a UNESCO World Heritage Site since 1985.

The Kings Highway brought us to the mouth of Petra, the capital of the ancient Nabataean Kingdom (Read: On the King’s Highway to find my pot of gold. Jordan). Significantly impressive is the city’s natural rock-cut architecture and water conduit system.

Brief historic timeline:

∇ 400-100 BC – The nomadic Nabataean tribes inhabit Petra living in tents and herding sheep, goats and camels, eventually settling down and expanding the city. During this period they grow to control the incense and spice trade within the Arab Peninsula
∇ 50 BC-50 AD – Petra is established as the capital
∇ 106 AD – Roman annex Petra under the rule of Emperor Trajan
∇ 363 AD – A powerful earthquake destroys half of Petra
∇ 600-700 AD – After the conquest of Saladin, Petra transitions to Islam

Photo-journey of what we saw:

When entering Petra, there is a short walk across a wide valley know as the Bab as-Sīq (Gateway to the Siq) towards the Siq. It is through the Siq that we reached the Treasury and other buildings such as the Roman theatre and the Monastery.

Bab as-Siq

Obelisk Tomb and the Bab As-Siq Triclinium

Obelisk Tomb and the Bab As-Siq Triclinium

The Siq is a natural geological fault split apart by tectonic forces, only to be worn smooth by water. later. The walls that enclose the Siq stand between 91–182 m (300–600 feet) in height.

The Siq

The Siq

The Siq

The Siq

Horse-drown carriages can take you from Bab as-Sīq (Gateway to the Siq) till before the Treasury

Horse-drown carriages can take you from Bab as-Sīq (Gateway to the Siq) till before the Treasury

Irrigation systems

Drainage system

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Oh great pink rock way up high!

Oh great pink rock way up high!

Final opening before the Treasury (Al Khazneh)

Final opening before the Treasury (Al Khazneh)

The Treasury was originally built as a mausoleum and crypt at the beginning of the 1st Century AD during the reign of Aretas IV Philopatris, who was the King of the Nabataeans from roughly 9 BC to AD 40.

 Al Khazneh (the Treasury)

Al Khazneh (the Treasury)

Al Khazneh (the Treasury)

Al Khazneh (the Treasury)

Inside the Treasury

Another shot of the magnificent Al Khazneh

Another shot of the magnificent Al Khazneh

Eeyore x 3

Eeyore x 4

After exiting the Treasury we came out into an open area where the Siq widens called The Street of Facades.

On both sides, there were a number of Nabataean burial interfaces decorated with grindstones. It is believed that these interfaces represents some of the senior officials in the city or princes.

The Street of Facades

The Street of Facades

aqq

The Roman Soldier’s Tomb

The 7000-seat Roman Theatre

The 7000-seat Roman Theatre

Roman theatre

Roman Theatre

Royal tombs

Royal tombs

The Urn Tomb

The Urn Tomb

 

Urn Tomb

The Urn Tomb

The Silk Tomb

The Silk Tomb

Antique columns

Colonnaded Street

Antique columns

Antique columns

Ancient columns

Ancient columns

At the end of the Colonnaded Street sits the temple known as the Qasr al-Bint al-Faroun meaning the Castle/Housem of the Daughter of Pharaoh. This relates to a local legend involving the pharaoh of the Exodus who, as the tale is told, got tired of pursuing the Israelites and eventually settled with his court here in Petra.

The Qasr el Bint al-Faroun (The House of the Daughter of Pharaoh)

Lone ranger

Lone ranger

 

 

30 thoughts on “Rose red city, half as old as time. Petra. A photo-journey.

  1. Pingback: On the King’s Highway to find my pot of gold. Jordan. « why is a raven like a writing desk?

  2. Wow….what lovely photos. Gorgeous photos and very nicely captured. Photo 4 & 5 remind me of Grand Canyon and Antelope canyon. Thanks for stopping by my blogs.

  3. Hello! Thanks for reading my blog – topatagonia. Dropped by yours and I’m completely blown away. Petra is on my bucket list too, and these pictures make me want to plan a trip NOW. Thanks for sharing your photo journey! 🙂

  4. I love and miss this place! I went there in Sept last year. They didn’t allow visitors to step close or go into the treasury building. So I wasn’t able to get a close look of the interior. Lucky you.

  5. My sister Lynda was recently in Petra. Your pictures, as her’s completely blew me away!!!! What an amazing place. I hope to get there one day!

  6. Aradhana, I have had occasion to see just a few, small, hazy photographs of Petra. Yours provided a lovely journey. Thanks and Kudos. If You have more photos on same, they would be Welcome. Any close-ups?

    On Stonehenge, do You not have different angles and close-ups? Regards.

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